FMCSA GRANTS EXEMPTION TO LIVESTOCK HAULERS

After a yearlong effort, the Agricultural & Food Transporters Conference, in conjunction with a coalition of livestock organizations, secured a one year exemption for livestock haulers from the 30 minute rest break. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration recently announced their decision to exempt drivers of vehicles hauling livestock from the 30-minute break requirement during the first eight hours of on-duty time. Drivers transporting agricultural commodities, including livestock, within a 150-air mile radius of the source of those commodities who already exempt from the HOS rules and are not affected by this action. In 2013, FMCSA granted livestock haulers a 90-day waiver during the hot summer months with no adverse effects to safety. FMCSA has received four petitions for exemptions, which only address the 30 minute break requirement of the HOS rule, and this is the second to be granted. Click here to view the federal register notice.

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Glostone Newsletter June, 2014

Glostone Newsletter

An Important Law Affecting CMV Drivers Goes Into Effect

To keep America’s interstate CMV drivers healthy and our roads safer, all interstate CMV drivers are now required to have their medical examinations performed by a Certified Medical Examiner listed on the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners. If you’re an interstate CMV driver, you already need a valid medical certificate signed by a medical examiner. The only change is that after May 21, 2014, you’ll need to go to a certified medical examiner for your medical certificate. If you’ve already had an exam and have a current certificate, that certificate will be valid until its regular expiration date.

You can find certified medical examiners in your area—or anywhere in the country—easily by: 1. Visit the National Registry Web site and search by Zip Code, State, or examiner name. 2. Choose a certified medical examiner from the list and call to make an appointment. 3. If your preferred health care professional isn’t on the list, simply refer him or her to the Certified Medical Examiners page to learn more about getting certified.

You can find more information by going to the National Registry Web site at https://nationalregistry.fmcsa.dot.gov/getting-started/or by calling CleanFleet at 503-479-6082.  CleanFleet can schedule a driver medical exam conducted by FMCSA certified Dr Julia Wilber at either their Clackamas or Marine Drive locations.

TELEMATICS SUCCESS ‘DOESN’T HAPPEN OVERNIGHT’

By Truck Fleet Management

Investment in a telematics system, commonly referred to as electronic on board recorders, should be seen as a long-term strategy that can generate results beyond initial goals, fleet management experts said here during the NAFA Fleet Management Association’s annual Institute & Expo.

“We have seen good results so far, but it doesn’t happen overnight,” said Scott Darling, corporate fleet manager for energy company BP PLC in Houston. Speaking during a panel discussion, Darling said his company’s focus is on driver safety and aims to use the data it collects to reduce accidents and injuries across its global fleet of 12,000 vehicles. About 80% of them are pickup trucks, he said.

In the company’s pipeline operation, around 300 trucks have been outfitted with telematics devices. But before those devices were installed, Darling said, BP researched the technology’s lifecycle.

“You have hardware costs, installation costs, activation costs and monthly fees,” he said, adding that fleets also must consider whether a selected vehicle will remain in service for the life of the telematics device. “You have to keep track of that, because it affects overall cost,” he said.

Keeping track of the data collected is a separate challenge, one that can occupy significant staff resources. “There is a return on investment consideration with people, too,” Darling said. “Who is looking at the data? Do you need an analyst? And do you need someone to manage the devices?”

Glostone Trucking Solutions works with clients using telematics to help manage their data.  “We work with each client on their individual telematics goals by providing management, analysis, reporting and storage of the data” says Dave Gray, President of Glostone Trucking Solutions.   “As an example, we have a client using the popular Rand McNally telematics system for its distance tracking used in IFTA tax reporting.  Rand McNally only stores the data for 6 months but IFTA requires the data be kept for 4 years.  We manage the data for the client, provide the IFTA tax reporting plus store the proper data components so the company is covered in the event of an audit,”

Telematics is a costly, upfront expense.  To make the investment cost effective, the data must be carefully managed and then aggressively integrated into the day to day operations of the company to reduce risk, lower costs, improve efficiencies and increase compliance.

 

Glostone Trucking Solutions Now An EROAD Dealer!

Glostone Trucking Solutions is proud to announce a strategic alliance with EROAD, a leading transport technology and services company.  EROAD is the first provider to offer motor carriers an electronic service for managing and paying weight-mile taxes.  In addition, the EROAD solution provides a wide-range of fleet tracking and regulatory services including IFTA and IRP reporting, fuel management, messaging and maintenance support.

The EROAD system received an independent unqualified opinion by the Oregon Secretary of State’s Audit Division that said in part “We found that the EROAD system accurately and reliably captures and calculates Oregon weight-mile tax information.  We also found the company provides a secure and stable environment for transmitting, processing and storing motor carrier weight-mile tax information.”

The Glostone-EROAD alliance means that Glostone can provide state of the art mileage tracking, tax reporting, and electronic logging systems to its clients.  EROAD users can manage the data system on their own or continue to partner with Glostone to expertly set up, maintain, manage and integrate the benefits of the EROAD system into their day to day operations.

The EROAD/Glostone combination provides carriers the tools and compliance expertise that will increase compliance, reduce risk, lower operating costs, improve efficiencies, and create better, safer drivers.  Call us for more information at 503-607-1088 or visit the EROAD website at www.eroad.com!

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Glostone Newsletter April 2014

Glostone Newsletter

ELD Rule Analysis

There is not a logging device in trucks or on the market today that meet the new ELD requirements.   The FMCSA has proposed its long awaited Electronic Logging Device or ELD rule.  This new rule is in the “proposed” stage whereby the FMCSA allows the public to give feedback and allows itself the option to make changes based that feedback.  At some point, the FMCSA will determine that they have heard all of the comments and will have made any necessary changes (or not).  At this point, they will change the status of this rule from “proposed” to “final”.  The ELD rule will become mandatory 2 years from the date the rule is made final.  The experts who follow FMCSA rulemakings expect the “proposal” stage of this process to take until spring of 2015.  Should the ELD rule then become a “final” rule, we can expect the rule to become mandatory in the spring of 2017. The rule itself covers over 250 pages of explanation, everything from what an ELD must and must not do to driver and company penalties for not using an ELD.  In the coming weeks, there should be lot’s of analysis and feedback.  After reading the 250 pages, one thing is for certain.  There is not a logging device in trucks or on the market today that meet the new ELD requirements.  ELD makers will be scrambling to meet the new requirements and have their systems added to the FMCSA approved ELD device list. One of the largest hurdles ELD makers will need to overcome is in reporting data to enforcement.  The data itself the FMCSA requires to be reported is not difficult for a typical ELD.  As a matter of fact, the driver location data must be “dumbed down” to meet the FMCSA reporting requirement.  Allow me to explain:  Many of today’s GPS location tracking devices are very accurate and can pinpoint a location to within a couple of meters.   A major criticism for mandating such location tracking devices (like an ELD) is the loss of driver privacy with government being privy to exact locations.  The FMCSA’s attempt to answer that criticism was to dumb down the location coordinate data required for reporting to enforcement. The FMCSA wants the reported location data to be in latitude and longitude coordinates with these coordinates ONLY being carried out to 2 decimal places.  When carried out to 2 decimal places, the location tracking accuracy is to within a mile give or take.   The FMCSA feels that this 1 mile location proximity is sufficient data for determining the accuracy of a drivers time driving.  It also allows the FMCSA to say they don’t have enough data to know exact location which protects the driver’s privacy.  The rule goes on to say that when a driver is using his truck for “personal conveyance”, the ELD can only report these location coordinates with 1 decimal allowing location accuracy to within 10 miles.  Again, the attempt is to protect the driver’s privacy when using his truck for non-commercial purposes. The problem for ELD makers becomes the dumbed down location data required by the FMCSA for electronic logging will not suffice for carriers who want to know exact location data for other purposes. Dispatching, routing, distance tracking required by the International Fuel Tax Agreement (IFTA) or the International Registration Plan (IRP) all require exact locations and distance calculations.   For IFTA and IRP, these agreements require, if GPS is used, highly accurate tracking and must account for every single mile the truck travels whether in commercial operation or not.  A carrier using the FMCSA dumbed down coordinates for IFTA and IRP record keeping will find they won’t have sufficient records to determine accurate distance when audited by state auditors. The FMCSA has offered some guidance which allows a carrier to collect detailed location and distance data for other purposes if they choose but what is reported to FMCSA enforcement can ONLY be to the accuracy level they have outlined.  This leaves the ELD makers, who may also offer truck location, IFTA and IRP data collection, needing to have the ability to collect very accurate location and distance, report dumbed down data to the FMCSA and very accurate data for IFTA and IRP.   Carriers will need to be very careful with any ELD systems they may purchase.  If meeting the FMCSA ELD mandate is the only concern of the carrier, a system that collects location coordinates once per hour and only reports that location to within 1 mile is perfectly fine.  If a carriers’ intent is to also use the data to know exactly where their trucks are at any given time and/or for IFTA and IRP reporting, the system purchased must be able to not only report dumbed down data to the FMCSA but collect and report much more accurate location coordinates for these other uses.    Time will tell if changes to the rule will be made.  One thing is for certain, change is coming!

April 30 is 1st QTR IFTA Fuel Tax Deadline

Now is the time to make sure that each truck’s distance and fuel purchase records for January, February and March are accumulated, recorded, and computed to generate your 1st Quarter 2014, International Fuel Tax Agreement tax report.  Reports and payments are due by April 30.  Any reports received after the deadline can be hit with penalties and interest.  Failing to turn in a report can place your company out of service.   Avoid the headache of tax reporting. The staff at Glostone are experts at both IFTA fuel tax and Oregon mileage tax reporting.  Give us a call today!

Driver Physicals Now Available

The DOT requires commercial drivers to be physically qualified to drive a motor vehicle.  To be qualified to drive, a physical exam is required and valid medical examination certificate obtained.    Our sister company CleanFleet has teamed up with Dr. Julia Wilber D.C. to provide driver physical examinations here at our office in Clackamas.  Other services can be performed as well including fitness agility testing and general chiropractic services.  Cost for a standard DOT driver physical is $75.00.  Appointments can be scheduled by calling 503-479-6082.

The California Air Resources Board Offering Free Webinar

The How to Comply with the Truck and Bus Regulation webinar focuses on compliance with CARB’s Truck and Bus Regulation, reporting, and proposed changes to the regulation. Also includes brief summaries of other diesel regulations.  The webinar is being offered: April 15 – Webinar (9:00-11:00) April 16 – Webinar (5:00PM-7:00PM)
For more information and to register for Course 521, please go to https://ssl.arb.ca.gov/training/courses.php?course=521
Please check the webpages for each course for revisions, cancellations, and additional sessions.

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An Important Law Affecting CMV Drivers Goes Into Effect May 21, 2014

To keep America’s interstate CMV drivers healthy and our roads safer, all interstate CMV drivers will soon be required to have their medical examinations performed by a Certified Medical Examiner listed on the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners.
If you’re an interstate CMV driver, you already need a valid medical certificate signed by a medical examiner. The only change is that after May 21, 2014, you’ll need to go to a certified medical examiner for your medical certificate. If you’ve already had an exam and have a current certificate, that certificate will be valid until its regular expiration date.
You can find certified medical examiners in your area—or anywhere in the country—easily by:
1. Visit the National Registry Web site and search by Zip Code, State, or examiner name.
2. Choose a certified medical examiner from the list and call to make an appointment.
3. If your preferred health care professional isn’t on the list, simply refer him or her to the Certified Medical Examiners page to learn more about getting certified.
You can find more information by going to the National Registry Web site at https://nationalregistry.fmcsa.dot.gov/getting-started/

Contact Us Today

ELD Rule Analysis

There is not a logging devise in trucks or on the market today that meet the new ELD requirements.

The FMCSA has proposed its long awaited Electronic Logging Devise or ELD rule this past week.  This new rule is in the “proposed” stage whereby the FMCSA allows the public to give feedback and allows itself the option to make changes based that feedback.  At some point, the FMCSA will determine that they have heard all of the comments and will have made any necessary changes (or not).  At this point, they will change the status of this rule from “proposed” to “final”.  The ELD rule will become mandatory 2 years from the date the rule is made final.

The experts who follow FMCSA rulemakings expect the “proposal” stage of this process to take until spring of 2015.  Should the ELD rule then become a “final” rule, we can expect the rule to become mandatory in the spring of 2017.

The rule itself covers over 250 pages of explanation, everything from what an ELD must and must not do to driver and company penalties for not using an ELD.  In the coming weeks, there should be lot’s of analysis and feedback.  After reading the 250 pages, one thing is for certain.  There is not a logging devise in trucks or on the market today that meet the new ELD requirements.  ELD makers will be scrambling to meet the new requirements and have their systems added to the FMCSA approved ELD devise list.

One of the largest hurdles ELD makers will need to overcome is in reporting data to enforcement.  The data itself the FMCSA requires to be reported is not difficult.  As a matter of fact, the driver location data must be “dumbed down” to meet the FMCSA reporting requirement.

Allow me to explain:  Todays GPS location tracking is very accurate and can pinpoint a location to within a couple of meters.   A major criticism for mandating such location tracking devises (like an ELD) is the loss of driver privacy and the ability for government to know exact locations.  The FMCSA’s attempt to answer that criticism was to dumb down the location coordinate data required for reporting to enforcement.

The FMCSA wants the reported location data while driving to be latitude and longitude coordinates and these coordinates to only be carried out to 2 decimal places.  When carried out to 2 decimal places, the location tracking accuracy is to within a mile give or take.   The FMCSA feels that this 1 mile location proximity is sufficient data for determining the accuracy of a drivers time driving.  It also allows the FMCSA to say they don’t have enough data to know exact location which protects the driver’s privacy.  The rule goes on to say that when a driver is using his truck for “personal conveyance”, the ELD can only report these location coordinates with 1 decimal allowing location accuracy to within 10 miles.  Again, the attempt is to protect the driver’s privacy when using his truck for non-commercial purposes.

The problem for ELD makers becomes the dumbed down data required by the FMCSA for electronic logging will not suffice for carriers who want to know exactly where their trucks are or for the distance tracking required by the International Fuel Tax Agreement (IFTA) or the International Registration Plan (IRP).  These agreements require, if GPS is used, highly accurate tracking and must account for every single mile the truck travels whether in commercial operation or not.  A carrier using the FMCSA dumbed down coordinates for IFTA and IRP record keeping will find they won’t have sufficient records to determine accurate distance when audited by state auditors.

The FMCSA has offered some guidance which allows a carrier to collect detailed location and distance data for other purposes but, what is reported to FMCSA enforcement can ONLY be to the accuracy level they have outlined.  This leaves the ELD makers who may also offer truck location, IFTA and IRP data collection, needing to have the ability to collect very accurate location and distance, report dumbed down data to the FMCSA and very accurate data for IFTA and IRP.

Carriers will need to be very careful with any ELD systems they may purchase.  If meeting the FMCSA ELD mandate is the only concern of the carrier, a system that collects location coordinates once per hour and only reports that location to within 1 mile is perfectly fine.  If a carriers’ intent is to also use the data to know exactly where their trucks are at any given time and/or for IFTA and IRP reporting, the system purchased must be able to not only report dumbed down data to the FMCSA but collect and report much more accurate location coordinates for these other uses.

Time will tell if changes to the rule will be made.  One thing is for certain, more change is coming!

Contact Us Today